Course title
7M2500001
Advanced Spectroscopy

rzeznicka izabela irena Click to show questionnaire result at 2019
Course content
The advanced molecular spectroscopy course aims to explain graduate students the physical chemistry used to describe molecular vibrations.
It will introduce students to the group theory which is used to predict molecular vibrations according to the symmetry of the molecule.
In the second half of the course, students will acquire knowledge about advanced topics in surface and interface-specific vibrational spectroscopies.
Purpose of class
In this class, students will learn how to use symmetry of the molecule and group theory to describe molecular vibrations and predict vibrational spectra.
Goals and objectives
  1. The students will be able to describe molecular vibrations using mathematical formulas.
  2. The students will learn how to use character tables to predict IR and Raman active normal modes.
  3. The students will be able to describe molecular orientation on surfaces based on polarization studies.
  4. The students will be able to apply surface and interface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to problems in science and technology.
Language
English
Class schedule

Class schedule HW assignments (Including preparation and review of the class.) Amount of Time Required
1. Review of quantum chemistry. Molecular symmetry. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
2. Review of quantum chemistry. Point groups. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
3. Group theory.
Character tables.
Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
100minutes
4. Application of character tables. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
100minutes
5. Molecular vibrations and normal modes.
Calculation of the energy of the normal modes using Gaussian.
Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
6. Molecular vibrations and normal modes.
Calculation of the energy of the normal modes using Gaussian.
Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
100minutes
Report #1 on Gaussian problem. 300minutes
7. Mid-term exam and discussion of solutions to the problems in the exam. Review acquired knowledge and read designated chapters
of the textbook.
300minutes
8. Polarization, overtones, inversion doubling. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
100minutes
9. Surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopies.
Polarization and orientation of molecules on surfaces.
Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
10. Nonlinear spectroscopy. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
11. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). Instrumentation. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
12. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Molecular orientation with TERS. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
100minutes
Report #2 on molecular orientation using Raman spectra. 300minutes
13. Instrumentation- lasers, photon detectors. Read handouts and review your own
knowledge on the topic.
190minutes
14. Final exam and discussion of solutions to the problems in the exam. Review acquired knowledge and read designated chapters
of the textbook.
300minutes
Total. - - 3030minutes
Relationship between 'Goals and Objectives' and 'Course Outcomes'

Reports Mid-term exam Final exam Total.
1. 5% 10% 5% 20%
2. 0% 10% 10% 20%
3. 10% 5% 15% 30%
4. 5% 5% 20% 30%
Total. 20% 30% 50% -
Evaluation method and criteria
Evaluation will be performed on the basis of class presentation, reports, mid-term exam and final exam.

Reports will contribute 20% to your grade.
Mid-term exam will contribute 30% to your grade.
Final exam will contribute 50% to your grade.

To pass the student must earn a total score of 60% or more.
Textbooks and reference materials
Donald A. McQuarrie, John D. Simon: Physical Chemistry: A Molecular Approach
P. W.Atkins: Physical Chemistry, 8th Edition, New York, 2006.
D. C. Harris, M.D. Bertolucci: Symmetry and Spectroscopy: Dover, 1989.
Prerequisites
Solid, undergraduate level background in physics, chemistry and mathematics.
Completed the basic molecular spectroscopy course.
The course is obligatory for students belonging to Dr. Rzeznicka's laboratory.
The course is intended for students who plan to enroll in PhD program and think about pursuing an academic career.
Office hours and How to contact professors for questions
  • Contact via e-mail, the e-mail addresses to Izabela Rzeznicka: izabela[at]shibaura-it.ac.jp
Regionally-oriented
Development of social and professional independence
  • Course that cultivates an ability for utilizing knowledge
  • Course that cultivates a basic problem-solving skills
Active-learning course
About half of the classes are interactive
Course by professor with work experience
Work experience Work experience and relevance to the course content if applicatable
N/A N/A
Education related SDGs:the Sustainable Development Goals
  • 4.QUALITY EDUCATION
Last modified : Sat Mar 21 13:25:14 JST 2020